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Resistant starch

Providing the optimal fibre balance

What is resistant starch?

Resistant starch is a prebiotic fibre that is crucial to the formation of good human gut microbiota. It feeds the beneficial bacteria of the large intestine. Research suggests that healthy gut microbiota significantly reduces the risk of colon cancer.

Resistant starch is defined as the total amount of starch and the products of starch degradation that resist digestion in the small intestine

Where other types of starch are broken down in the small intestine, resistant starch is digested by the large intestine. This improves digestive health through the fermentation of the starch by good bacteria in the bowel.

When these good bacteria are dominant in the gut, they establish an environment that nourishes the cells that line the gut wall and provide important immune signals that establish a healthy immune response.

“The evidence suggests that the three main types of fibre, soluble, insoluble and resistant starch,
offer a range of important health benefits and so we should aim to consume
a combination of different types of fibre daily.”

– Dr Tony Bird, CSIRO

BarleyMAX - Resistant starch

Many consumers know that eating fibre is important, but what is most important is eating a variety of fibres, including soluble, insoluble and resistant starch.

What are the benefits?

encourages the growth of healthy bacteria in the bowel, known as the ‘prebiotic effect’
produces short chain fatty acids, which provide nourishment for the good bacteria to promote intestinal health and can help to prevent colon cancer
helps to improve insulin sensitivity and improves glucose control
helps to lower cholesterol
promotes bowel regularity
may improve satiety

The Hungry Microbiome

Why resistant starch is good for you

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How much resistant starch is present in BARLEYmax®?

BARLEYmax® contains approximately 3% resistant starch.

BARLEYmax® is an excellent source of fibre and it contains as much as 4 times more resistant starch when compared to other grains such as barley, wheat, oats and rye.

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BARLEYmax® Fact

The good bacteria in the gut generate a series of beneficial changes within the body, through the fermentation of the resistant starch to produce short chain fatty acids (such as butyric acid). These short chain fatty acids can be used as an energy source by the cells lining the colon and may also have an anti-cancer effect.

Scientific research found diets rich in resistant starch reduced DNA damage (as often caused by high-protein, low-fibre diets) and reversed mucus thinning in the bowel. Healthy bacterial metabolism in the colon may also prevent colon cancer.